Rethinking Insider Trading Compliance Policies in Light of the SEC’s New “Shadow Trading” Theory of Insider Trading Liability

To me, the most interesting question raised by the Panuwat case, and the problem of shadow trading more generally, is why would Medivation (or any company) adopt such a broadly worded insider trading policy? How did this broad proscription on employee trading benefit Medivation’s shareholders?

Medivation’s shareholders could not have been harmed by Panuawat’s trading. Such trading could not affect Medivation’s stock price, nor could it put the acquisition in jeopardy. So why is the blanket proscription against trading in “another publicly traded company” in the policy at all? The final sentence of the policy as quoted above suggests that the drafters were under the impression that such trading would be illegal under the securities laws. This may be true under the misappropriation theory, but only because Medivation chose to make it so by including the language in the policy….

Source: Rethinking Insider Trading Compliance Policies in Light of the SEC’s New “Shadow Trading” Theory of Insider Trading Liability – Business Law Prof Blog